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EDITIONS
Drive to increase live kidney donors
transplant surgery
More donors needed for tranplants
Doctors are to receive expert advice in how to persuade relatives of kidney patients to donate an organ.

National guidelines published on Thursday are aimed at tackling the chronic shortage of donor kidneys needed for transplant surgery.

The guidance sets out for the first time the conditions required for donations and how to mentally and physically prepare potential donors to donate a kidney.

There is a considerable wait for donor kidneys and people needing a transplant face months or years on dialysis waiting for a suitable organ, which has been removed from a dead person.


We hope that by providing clear guidance for doctors, we will be able to identify more people who are suitable as living donors

Dr John Scoble, Guy's Hospital
Live kidney donations allow them to receive a new kidney immediately and, if donated by a family member, there is a greater chance of the organ being a perfect match.

Donors can live with just one kidney without any problems.

Dr John Scoble, clinical director of the adult renal unit at Guy's Hospital, where staff were involved in drawing up the guidelines, said: "We hope that by providing clear guidance for doctors, we will be able to identify more people who are suitable as living donors.

"This will enable more patients with kidney disease to receive a transplant kidney and have a better chance of long term recovery."

Consistent approach

The guidance, issued by the British Transplantation Society and the Renal Association, will allow a consistent approach to be taken by doctors nation-wide.

It includes advice on how to ensure potential donors are physically and psychologically fit to donate, including looking at their previous medical history.

Blood pressure, previous cases of cancer, renal disease and diabetes would all be taken into account.

Lisa Burnapp, senior nurse at Guy's renal unit, said: "The general picture is that a transplant from a living donor is the best option for the recipient.

"We are hoping the effect of the guidelines will be that more suitable donors will be identified."

See also:

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