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Last Updated: Friday, 22 December 2006, 13:42 GMT
English 'now more accident prone'
Crocodile
One of the more unusual reasons for a visit to hospital
Forty thousand more people were admitted to hospital following an accident in England in 2005-06 than in the previous year, figures show.

The Information Centre for health and social care recorded just over 593,000 admissions during the year.

Explosions, bites and falls were all on the rise.

There were two cases where people were bitten or struck by crocodiles or alligators and five cases involving venomous spiders.

Non-poisonous insect bites were responsible for over 2,000 admissions, a number which has doubled over the last five years.

Of all venomous creatures, by far the single most common culprit was the hornet, with 627 occurrences.

Playground injuries

The figures show that getting into scrapes is no longer simply a predicament for the young.

Playground hi-jinks among the over 60s resulted in 53 hospital admissions in NHS hospitals last year, an increase from the 45 injured on the swings and roundabouts in 2004-2005.

Lightning
Fifty people were treated for lightning burns

The number of older adults falling from trees also rose by 46% to 60 admissions.

As Christmas shopping hits its peak this weekend, it is worth remembering that 116 people were classified as being "crushed, pushed or stepped on by a crowd or human stampede".

Extreme temperatures proved hazardous, as the number of people who were brought into hospital due to the hot weather nearly doubled from 46 to 86.

Fifty people were classed as being struck by lightning, while people were nearly three times more likely to be a victim of a volcanic eruption than avalanche with figures of 38 and 13 respectively.

There were also 61 cases that could only be categorised as "exposure to other and unspecified forces of nature."

Two people went into hospital after a "prolonged stay in a weightless environment".

While it is not clear what has prompted the classification, past mishaps have involved trainee astronauts and riders of roller coasters.

Accidents involving the discharging of fireworks amounted to 166 hospital admissions last year, with the majority of victims being young men.


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