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Tuesday, 17 October, 2000, 12:11 GMT 13:11 UK
Emergency medicine
Casualty doctors practice medicine at the sharp end. BBC News Online examines how they tackle some of the most serious problems.


Minutes matter
Everyone is familiar with the blur of activity as a seriously injured patient is rushed into A&E. But what's actually going on?


A head for trouble
An injury to the head can have dire consequences - and advances in medical technology mean that doctors have more chance than ever to save life and prevent permanent damage.


Feeling the chill
Hypothermia is a killer, and medics have to act fast to negate its terrible effects.


Playing with poison
So many substances - and infections - can poison the body. So how do doctors find out which one is to blame?


Surviving the crash
Road traffic accidents bring heartbreak for families. But the death rate is falling, due partly to the growing skills of doctors.


Trouble in mind
The accident and emergency department often has to help those with psychiatric and psychological disorders. The problem is often identifying those most at risk.

Saving your skin
The way doctors deal with burns has been revolutionised in recent years, giving more patients than ever the chance of surviving.


On the scene
Highly skilled paramedics, 'flying doctors' and helicopter crews can make a big difference to survival chances. BBC News Online looks at the professionals involved.


Fill the wards with drunken folly
A&E units can be put under serious strain by patients suffering from the after-effects of alcohol abuse. What is is like for the doctors involved?

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


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