BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Health  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
Medical notes
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Bristol baby surgeon breaks down
Janardan Dhasmana
Janardan Dhasmana: "Wish I could turn clock back"
A surgeon has broken down in tears as he apologised to families whose children died in the Bristol heart baby scandal.

Janardan Dhasmana said he wished he could turn the clock back.


Whatever suffering I have gone through is no match to the suffering of losing a child

Janardan Dhasmana
He said: "But it is not possible and I can't really do any more."

Mr Dhasmana was speaking at the public inquiry into the treatment and care of babies undergoing complex heart surgery at Bristol Royal Infirmary between 1983 and 1995.

The inquiry was set up over concerns about the high death rate at the unit and followed a General Medical Council (GMC) inquiry, which struck off two of his colleagues - medical director at United Bristol Healthcare Trust James Wisheart, and hospital manager Dr John Roylance.

Mr Dhasmana was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the GMC investigation into the treatment of babies at the hospital.

He was banned from operating on children for three years.

Mr Dhasmana told the inquiry on Thursday: "Whatever suffering I have gone through is no match to the suffering of losing a child.

"I am not a cavalier surgeon. I did not and I do not risk any patient's life unless I believe fully I can benefit them.

"Unfortunately it didn't work. I wish I had not operated on those children."

The surgeon said: "I never believed in using patients as guinea pigs. I followed the practice at the time as I saw my elders and seniors doing.

"I do not consider myself an incompetent doctor and I hope the inquiry finds that out."

Mr Dhasmana wept and said he was "ruined" by the scandal.

As his wife sobbed in the public gallery, Mr Dhasmana added: "Except for expressing my regret, I feel I cannot do anything more.

"I am sure this inquiry will find some guideline to prevent what has happened.

"My results, barring arterial switch, should speak of myself as a surgeon and I hope the inquiry looks more carefully to make a meaningful judgement on that."

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes