BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Health  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
Medical notes
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 23 November, 1999, 00:48 GMT
Time called on smoke-filled pubs
Smokey bar
Customers favour smoke-free zones in pubs
A study has shown that introducing no-smoking areas is good business for pubs.

The research showed that takings in pubs that had introduced no-smoking areas were up by seven per cent.

No-smoking provision in pubs and restaurants is practical good business

Clive Bates, director, ASH
The move was overwhelmingly supported by pub-goers. Three-quarters of those surveyed said it was a "very good" or "good" idea.

South Staffordshire Smoke-Free Alliance carried out the survey of 10 pubs in Staffordshire that have introduced no-smoking areas.

The pub industry signed up to a Public Places Charter last year which promised to improve conditions for non-smokers.

Conservatism and trepidation

Clive Bates
Clive Bates says no-smoking areas are good for business
Clive Bates, director of the anti-smoking charity Action on Smoking and Health (ASH), said the results of the survey showed that pubs could now push ahead with providing non-smoking areas without fear of losing customers.

He said: "There has been a lot of inertia, conservatism and trepidation among the pub industry, but this survey shows that providing good conditions for people who do not smoke or who do not want to breathe in other people's smoke is a sensible way forward.

"We are not trying to push pubs into total bans on all smokers, but the majority of their customers want a choice to be provided.

"This work shows that no-smoking provision in pubs and restauarants is practical good business."

Mr Bates said there was strong scientific evidence to link passive smoking to lung cancer and heart disease.

He said asthmatics were effectively barred from many pubs because smoke exacerbated their condition.

The new research appears to show the idea of no-smoking areas in pubs is gaining ground.

Pub-by-pub reviews

Victuallers will not turn down the opportunity of increasing trade

Tony Payne, Federation of Licensed Victuallers Associations
A Office for National Statistics poll conducted in 1997 showed 51% of all adults, and just 24% of smokers favoured restrictions on smoking in pubs.

Tony Payne, chief executive of the Federation of Licensed Victuallers Associations, said: "Victuallers will not turn down the opportunity of increasing trade.

"But each pub must review its own position. Some pubs only have one room and they are going to make decisions in the best interests of their customers, their staff and themselves."

Mr Payne said Holt's Brewery in Manchester had built a non-smoking room onto one of its pubs, only to find that it stood empty once it had opened.

He said many pubs had introduced efficient ventilation and air cleaning systems to reduce the impact of tobacco smoke.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Tom Sandars reports for BBC News
"This seems like a victory for the consumer age we live in"
Peter Bull, NAHL
"We're against enforcement"
See also:

17 Aug 99 | Health
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes