BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in:  Health
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Background Briefings 
Medical notes 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Thursday, 23 September, 1999, 11:29 GMT 12:29 UK
Hope for bone marrow transplant children
wilson
Nathan Wilson can paly for hours since his operation
Doctors at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London have developed a new kind of transplant for very sick children who cannot have normal bone marrow transplants.

Twelve children, who would otherwise have died, have had the new treatment successfully.

One of these was 12-year-old Nathan Wilson, who just one year ago was dying.

His liver was failing because of a rare genetic problem which meant his immune system did not work properly.

nathan
Nathan was too weak for conventional treatment
He needed a bone marrow transplant. But he was so sick, the chemotherapy needed before a transplant would have killed him.

At Great Ormond Street they gave him a new kind of treatment - a mini bone marrow transplant. It uses a chemotherapy drug which even Nathan's damaged liver could survive.

Dr Paul Veys said: "The drugs that are used in this are far more easily tolerated more gentle on both these organs.

Veys
Dr Paul Veys says the treatment offers very sick children hope
"So even if the lungs or liver are damaged the child tolerates them and the graft goes in."

It has changed Nathan's life and he has now started secondary school.

"Now I can play football and run around a lot," he said.

"Before I could only stay out for like half an hour - now I can stay out for, like three hours."

Doctors now hope too use the procedure on children suffering other genetic diseases.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Video
The BBC's Daniel Sandford: "A mini bone marrow transplant"
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories