BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Health  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
Medical notes
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Thursday, 16 September, 1999, 12:40 GMT 13:40 UK
Spa baths 'help control diabetes'
insulin
In one case the need for insulin was reduced
Half an hour in a Jacuzzi each day could help control diabetes, a study suggests.

In one case, it was so successful that one of the participants was able to reduce his insulin intake by almost a fifth.

The researchers had hoped the time spent in a hot tub would mimic the effects of exercise - which is already known to reduce the need for insulin.

The pilot study suggested their theory had potential and they are now looking to run a larger study to confirm the benefits of Jacuzzi therapy.

Sugar overload

Diabetes occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin - an essential hormone that controls the amount of sugar in the blood.

There are two types of the disease - type I, also known as insulin-dependent diabetes, and type II, which mainly affects older people, especially if they are overweight.

Dr Philip Hooper, of the McKee Medical Centre in Loveland, Colorado, conducted the study with people suffering type II diabetes.

The test group of eight patients included three who regularly had injections of insulin, while the other five took various other treatments.

They had all suffered diabetes for between three and 14 years and found that the Jacuzzi therapy over three weeks reduced blood sugar levels by 13%.

Quality of life

They also experienced a greater sense of well-being and found it easier to sleep.

The only drawback was that when the water rose above 40C, the volunteers became dizzy and had to be helped from the tub.

"Results suggest that hot-tub therapy should be further evaluated as a therapy for patients with type II diabetes mellitus," Dr Hooper said.

"It may be especially helpful for patients who are unable to exercise."

See also:

09 Feb 99 | Medical notes
19 Aug 99 | Health
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes