Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education



Front Page

World

UK

UK Politics

Business

Sci/Tech

Health

Education

Sport

Entertainment

Talking Point

In Depth

On Air

Archive
Feedback
Low Graphics
Help

Thursday, July 15, 1999 Published at 11:23 GMT 12:23 UK


Health

MPs to tackle kidney disease

Kidney surgery: Donor organs are in short supply

MPs have launched a group to tackle the "crisis" in fighting kidney disease.

The All Party Renal Services Group in the House of Commons has been set up in response to lobbying by the National Kidney Federation.

Campaigners want to highlight the problems of limited resources, long waits for transplant operations, falling numbers of donations and rising demand.

Figures show that in 1997 there was a three per cent increase in the number of people on the kidney transplant waiting lists and a seven per cent drop in the number of transplants carried out.

The issue of kidney organ donation hit the headlines last week when it was disclosed that a man's family insisted his organs went to a white person.

Doctors voted last week at the British Medical Association's annual conference to lobby the Government for an "opt out" system of donation, where people must specifically state that they do not want to donate their organs.

'Falling standards of care'

Austin Donohoe, chairman of the National Kidney Federation, said: "Hospitals are struggling to cope with existing numbers of kidney patients which is expected to rise by 50% in the next five years.

"Patients are facing falling standards of care and exclusion from life-saving treatment.

"We need a full investigation into the crisis affecting kidney patients and action to prevent unnecessary suffering and death.

"We are delighted MPs are going to tackle this problem in parliament."

Tottenham's Labour MP Bernie Grant, who has suffered from kidney disease, is one member of the all-party group.

He said: "I am appalled that treatment falls far short of demand.

"People of Afro-Caribbean and Asian origin are far more likely to suffer from kidney disease and much more needs to be done.

"Urgent action is needed to provide proper treatment for all people who need it, whatever their race."



Advanced options | Search tips




Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage | ©


Health Contents

Background Briefings
Medical notes

Relevant Stories

07 Jun 99 | Health
Needle found in baby's kidney

14 Apr 99 | Health
Steroid aid for kidney disease and HIV

19 Feb 99 | Health
Liver and kidney transplant is world first





Internet Links


National Kidney Research Fund and Kidney Foundation

Kidney disease


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.




In this section

Disability in depth

Spotlight: Bristol inquiry

Antibiotics: A fading wonder

Mental health: An overview

Alternative medicine: A growth industry

The meningitis files

Long-term care: A special report

Aids up close

From cradle to grave

NHS reforms: A guide

NHS Performance 1999

From Special Report
NHS in crisis: Special report

British Medical Association conference '99

Royal College of Nursing conference '99