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Last Updated: Thursday, 26 August, 2004, 11:20 GMT 12:20 UK
Third of teens want cosmetic ops
Jordan
But 80% thought Jordan had had too much surgery
One in three teenagers says they want to have cosmetic surgery, a survey suggests.

Bliss magazine questioned 2,000 teenagers across Britain, with an average age of 15. They found 42% had considered surgery.

A third said they would spend "what they had to" for surgery, with the most popular procedure being a tummy tuck.

Helen Johnston, editor of Bliss, said celebrities admitting to surgery made it more acceptable to teenagers.

Celebrities admitting to the odd op, and reality TV shows and TV dramas based around plastic surgery are just making it seem more accessible to young women
Helen Johnston, Bliss editor
While over half of the teenagers questioned wanted a tummy tuck, 48% want thinner thighs.

The same percentage said they wanted a breast enlargement, while 7% said they wanted smaller breasts.

Fifteen per cent said they would most like a nose-job.

Body obsession 'growing'

Cosmetic surgery was seen as an accessible way of improving looks, which was important to the teenagers, 85% of whom believed appearance affected self esteem.

It was also seen as something which should be easily accessible, with 41% believing surgery should be more widely available for free on the NHS.

But a quarter said they would pay up to 5,000 for surgery.

Some are already preparing for their operation. Three per cent said they were already saving up.

And knowing an adult who had had cosmetic surgery made a teenager 6% more likely to want it themselves.

But the survey showed teenagers did not always think cosmetic surgery improved a person's looks.

Eighty-one per cent said Jordan looked better before surgery, and said she needed a breast reduction.

Helen Johnston, said: "Body image obsession is growing year by year, and quick fix solutions like plastic surgery are becoming easier and more prolific just as rapidly.

"Celebrities admitting to the odd op, and reality TV shows and TV dramas based around plastic surgery are just making it seem more accessible to young women. "


SEE ALSO:
Teens going 'under the knife'
21 Nov 03  |  Magazine


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