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Monday, February 22, 1999 Published at 18:54 GMT


Health

Woman sues over Aids doctor shock

The hospital employed the doctor for six months

A woman is to sue a hospital after the doctor who treated her died of Aids.

She is to take out a civil claim for damages for "psychiatric shock" against the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital.

Dr Olukayode Fasawe was a gynaecologist at the hospital before his death from an Aids-related illness in February 1997.

He treated the woman, who has remained unnamed, while he was HIV positive.

'Vigorous defence'

A spokeswoman for the hospital said the claim would be "vigorously defended". She confirmed staff had received notice of the action.

Mr Fasawe was employed at the Royal Shrewsbury for six months.

He died aged 28, soon after transferring to the Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital.

The spokeswoman added: "As far as the hospital is concerned we followed all the Government guidelines on appointing medical staff. There was no negligence by the hospital."

Mr Fasawe also worked for the Frimley Park NHS Trust in Surrey.

His death prompted a health scare initially, but no-one was found to have been infected with HIV while receiving treatment from him.

The woman's solicitor was unavailable for comment.



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