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 Monday, 6 January, 2003, 12:00 GMT
Celebrity mums 'bad for health'
Victoria Beckham
Victoria Beckham: A role model for many women
Pregnant women are being urged to put their health first and to avoid trying to look like celebrity mums like Victoria Beckham and Liz Hurley.

The new generation of famous mums has been credited with making pregnancy sexy - showing off their bumps with cropped tops and clingy dresses.

But experts say this has left many ordinary women feeling inadequate and under pressure to look good.

It's time we put the record straight by raising the profile of 'real mums'.

Debbie Davies, Bounty
In some cases, it has prompted women to diet while pregnant, putting their own and their baby's health at risk.

The trend has prompted one marketing company to launch a campaign to encourage the use of "real mums" in television and newspaper adverts.

Staff at Bounty say they hope their campaign can help to reduce the pressure many ordinary mums feel.

Concern

Debbie Davies, head of marketing at Bounty, said many women are concerned that they don't look as good as celebrities did when they are pregnant.

"We receive hundreds of e-mails and letters everyday from women who are concerned that they don't look like Victoria Beckham did during her pregnancy or haven't managed to get into their old jeans five months after the birth," she said.

"It's time we put the record straight by raising the profile of 'real mums'. This way we can help women to feel good about being pregnant and motivated to stay fit and healthy for the sake of themselves and their baby."

Elizabeth Hurley
Liz Hurley gave birth to son Damien last year
The campaign is backed by BBC television presenter and mother Lowri Turner.

"Real women expand all over, making a cropped top and combats not that attractive in later months," she said.

The campaign is also supported by the charity Baby Lifeline.

Its chief executive Judy Ledger said: "Images of celebrities affect everyone, including pregnant women, some of whom feel under pressure to diet. This can have drastic effects on their own and their baby's health."

Speaking to BBC News Online, she added: "Celebrity mums like Liz Hurley can afford a personal trainer and a nanny and are able to go on a sensible diet after they give birth. Most ordinary women cannot."

See also:

04 Sep 02 | Entertainment
04 Apr 02 | Entertainment
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