BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Health  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
Medical notes
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 19 November, 2002, 19:13 GMT
Airlines reject DVT claims
Airline seats
The airlines have all denied liability
Airlines accused of failing to warn passengers about the potentially fatal medical condition deep vein thrombosis will contest the case "vigorously", a London court has heard.

Fifty-five people are claiming compensation from 27 airlines, claiming they were insufficiently warned about the risk of developing DVT, also known as economy class syndrome.

A High Court judge must first decide if DVT can be viewed as an accident under the terms of the 1929 Warsaw Convention.

Robert Lawson, who is representing all the airlines except Qantas, told the court in London: "In the event that any of the actions proceed any further, the carriers will challenge them - both at a generic and at an individual level."

Omission allegations

Claimants are expected to argue they suffered because of "acts and omissions" by the airlines, including having seating too close together and failing to warn passengers of the dangers.

Mr Lawson said the claimants' case was wrong as a matter of law.

The airlines will argue that they are protected under the 70-year-old convention from paying compensation for medical problems classed as a passenger reaction to the normal operation of an aircraft.

British Airways has said it will fight claims based on advice given by the UK government and the World Health Organisation that no specific link has been established between flying and DVT.

Shares delay

DVT is a condition where a small blood clot forms in the deep veins, particularly in the legs, and complications in other organs can lead to death.

The landmark case had to be halted last month after the presiding judge Mr Justice Nelson revealed he had BA shares.

But the hearing resumed on Monday after no objection was raised to him continuing in the case after he sold his interests in the airline.

The hearing was adjourned until Wednesday.



Background
See also:

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes