BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Health  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
Medical notes
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 11 September, 2002, 09:31 GMT 10:31 UK
'It's my only chance to have a baby'
Natallie Evans
Ms Evans was diagnosed with cancer last year
Natallie Evans is seeking the permission of the courts to continue her IVF treatment.

Ms Evans, 30, from Wiltshire, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer last year and is now unable to have a child naturally.

She started IVF treatment last year with her then partner, Howard Johnston. Six embryos have been fertilised with his sperm.

I had ovarian cancer

However, Mr Johnston has since withdrawn his consent for the procedure to go ahead. Under current law, the embryos cannot be used and must be destroyed if one of the parties objects to the procedure.

Cancer diagnosed

"In September of last year, me and my ex were undergoing fertility treatment because we were trying for a baby and I hadn't fallen pregnant," Ms Evans told the BBC.

"[Doctors] started to do some tests. They did a laparoscopy, which is a camera into the belly button, and they found abnormalities on my ovaries.

"I was taken back into hospital for a laparotomy, which is a slice across the stomach, and they found that I had ovarian cancer.

"The only way I could go forward was to have IVF because they wanted my ovaries removed as soon as possible. My ovaries were removed in November."

The only way I could go forward was to have IVF

Ms Evans says Mr Johnston agreed to allow the IVF treatment to continue even after their relationship ended.

"Three weeks after our relationship broke down Howard and myself discussed what would happen to the embryos.

"He said I was still able to use them but he wanted a legal binding contract drawn up to say I wouldn't take him for maintenance or he wouldn't be named as the father so he would have no responsibility.

"We were both happy with that. I said I was not ready to have them implanted yet so when the time is near we will discuss it more in detail and go to a solicitor.

"This is how it was left until I received the letter on the 30 July."

She says she does not know why he has decided to withdraw his consent to the procedure.

Ms Evan's was informed of that decision by letter on 30 July.

"I haven't had any contact with Howard since I received the letter from the clinic so I don't know his reasoning."

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes