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Thursday, 22 August, 2002, 16:53 GMT 17:53 UK
Early mobiles 'brain tumour risk'
Mobile phone
Early mobile phones produced an analogue signal
A controversial study claims to have found a link between analogue mobile phones and tumours - but this finding is disputed by other experts.

And there is no suggestion that the results have relevance to modern digital phones.

The Swedish research, published in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention, looked at 1,617 brain tumour patients, some of whom had used early analogue handsets from Nordic Mobile Telephone, comparing them with a similar group of apparently healthy people.

They found that those who had used the handsets had a 30% higher risk of developing tumours than people who did not.

People who had used the handsets for more than 10 years appeared to have an 80% higher risk.

The tumours were more likely to develop on the side of the brain nearest to the phone.

Cordless and digital

Cordless phones and modern digital (GSM) cellphones appeared so far to carry no additional risks, even after five year's use, said the research team from the National Institute for Working Life in Sweden.

Researcher Professor Kjell Hansson Mild said: "Nothing can be said about GSM at this stage.


There have been close to 200 studies done on different areas of mobile phones...there is no health risk

Spokesman, Nokia

"These are tumours that develop very slowly, and GSM does not have users who have been using it for 10 years."

Analogue networks are still operating in more than 40 countries, and the NMT phones were defended by Finland's Nokia on Thursday.

A spokesman said: "There have been close to 200 studies done on different areas of mobile phones and in the light of those and the way the scientific evidence is, there is no health risk in using mobile phones."

She added that NMT phones adhered to energy absorption limits set by the EU.

A spokesman for Sweden's Telefon AB LM Ericsson said: "The study and the conclusions it reaches differ from at least three other studies in the past in several highly regarded scientific journals.

"None of these studies found a connection between mobile phones and cancer."

See also:

19 Jun 02 | Health
17 Jun 02 | Health
11 May 00 | Health
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