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Wednesday, 21 August, 2002, 23:02 GMT 00:02 UK
Jealous types 'have different-sized feet'
Can physical features reveal a jealous streak?
Different-sized feet or different-sized hands could identify potentially jealous lovers, a study suggests.

Researchers in Canada believe people who are asymmetrical are more likely to be a so-called jealous type.

Previous studies have suggested that people with one hand bigger than the other are less attractive to the opposite sex and are less fertile and healthy.


The individual more likely to be philandered on is more likely to be jealous

William Brown, Dalhousie University
Hormone imbalances in the womb can cause people to have children to be born with and subsequently grow up with one foot larger than the other.

William Brown and colleagues at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia believe they could also make people more prone to jealousy.

They looked at 50 men and women in various kinds of heterosexual relationships.

Physical features

They compared the sizes of paired physical features such as feet, hands and ears and asked participants to answer questions to assess their romantic jealousy.

According to New Scientist magazine, they found a strong link between symmetry and romantic jealousy.

The researchers carried out further tests to see if people with different-sized features were more likely to be jealous in other situations, such as at work.

However, those tests suggested that their jealous streak only applied to their romantic relationships.

Brown suggested the findings backed up previous results indicating that asymmetrical people are less attractive.

"If jealousy is a strategy to retain your mate, then the individual more likely to be philandered on is more likely to be jealous," he said.

See also:

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