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Wednesday, October 21, 1998 Published at 12:51 GMT 13:51 UK


Health

Screws tighten on smokers

Intolerance against smoking in public places has grown in recent years

A majority of Britons want a ban on all tobacco advertising - including nearly 50% of smokers.

A survey by the Office for National Statistics shows 60% of people think tobacco adverts should be banned.

The annual study shows a growing intolerance of smoking and for the first time asks non-smokers for their views.

Almost half of non-smokers said they considered whether a restaurant had a non-smoking section when they went out.

A fifth say they also took into account whether pubs and bars had no-smoking areas.

According to the survey, 60% of women and over half of men non-smokers do not like smokers near them.

Publication of the survey comes amid calls for tighter regulations on smoking in public.

It shows that health campaigns have had some impact.

Smoking restrictions


[ image: Many smokers stub out their cigarettes in front of children]
Many smokers stub out their cigarettes in front of children
Around 85% of people said they thought smoking at work, in restaurants and other public places should be restricted.

Fifty-two per cent wanted curbs on smoking in pubs.

Over 90% of people surveyed had a good knowledge of the effects of passive smoking on children.

Over 80% knew that passive smoking increased adults' chance of getting lung cancer, bronchitis and asthma.

Giving up

The survey of over 16-year-olds, carried out in 1997, showed smokers were more likely to put health as a reason for wanting to give up smoking than in 1996.

Seventy-two per cent wanted to give up.

Over half did not smoke in front of children. A further third said they would smoke less if children were present.

Forty-five per cent would not smoke in front of non-smoking adults.



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