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MMR: Mothers divided
Stanley has had the MMR vaccination
Stanley has had the MMR vaccination
As the debate over the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination rages on, two mothers on either side of the argument explain their choices to the BBC.


Shani Hinton is mother to Stanley, who is almost two, and twelve week old Jacob.

Shani decided to allow Stanley to have the MMR immunisation after doing a lot of reading and talking to doctors .

Shani Hinton says she will think again when baby Jacob needs the jab
Shani Hinton says she will think again when baby Jacob needs the jab
Shani told the BBC: "We decided that the risk of either measles, mumps or rubella was greater than the risk of autism.

"All the evidence that we read pointed in that direction and there was nothing to show that there was a real connection with autism.

"So we decided that was the way forward for us."

She added: "There will always be people who are convinced their children are autistic because of the MMR.

"And there will always be people, like me, who feel that the evidence is the other way and there is no link."

Jacob is set to have his MMR immunisation in a year's time, but Shani says she will look again at all the evidence about the jab's safety before going ahead.

Concerns

Natalie Passey is mum to 18-month-old Louise and Charlie, eight weeks.

Baby Charlie's mum Natalie says she is unconvinced of MMR's safety
Baby Charlie's mum Natalie says she is unconvinced of MMR's safety
She is adamant that neither will have the MMR jab

"With the autism, the constant ear infections, high temperatures, the rashes - I'm just not prepared to put my son at risk."

She called for information which would confirm the jab's safety for parents.

She wants a guarantee there is no danger.

"Some documentation, or reliable medical information from GP surgeries or the government to prove that there is no link whatsoever."


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See also:

06 Feb 02 | Health
28 Jan 02 | Panorama
04 Jan 02 | Health
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