BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Health  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
Medical notes
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Friday, 7 December, 2001, 15:20 GMT
Cold air and exercise trigger asthma
Lung test
The UK has one of the highest asthma rates
The key triggers for asthma attacks are cold air, exercise, the menstrual cycle and aspirin, according to a new study.

Researchers carried out a study of 97 patients from the PARA UK database - the first ever long-term study of patients with "at risk" asthma.

They found:

  • 70% of patients claimed both cold air and exercise as a key trigger for an asthma attack
  • 21% claimed attacks could be triggered by allergies to peanuts
  • 14% of patients found aspirin to be a common trigger
  • 10% of females declared their asthma episodes were related to their menstrual cycle
  • 55% said laughter could cause an attack.

    The findings were unveiled at a British Thoracic Society meeting.

    Professor Chung, lead author of the research said: "These findings help expose some of the key risk factors for asthma sufferers and will be especially useful for those with severe asthma.

    Increase in asthma

    "It is important that asthmatics live their lives to the full.

    "We hope this research will help improve the management of their condition and patients may plan with their asthma nurse or doctors how best to manage, or in some circumstances, avoid certain situations which may trigger an asthma attack."


    These findings help expose some of the key risk factors for asthma sufferers and will be especially useful for those with severe asthma

    Professor Chung, asthma expert
    Dr John Harvey, Chairman of the British Thoracic Society (BTS), said: "This is useful research which demonstrates how important it is for asthmatics, whether their condition is severe or mild, to plan with their carers for the effects of certain situations.

    "We hope that research and investment will continue into the causes and effects of severe asthma attacks in order to help the millions of sufferers in the UK."

    Recent statistics from the BTS, show that just over one in 10 adults and 20% of children have doctor-diagnosed asthma.

    Asthma levels in the UK have risen 14% in males and 165% in females between the 1980s and 1990s.

    The research was carried out by Professor Chung, from the National Heart And Lung Institure, Professor Jon Ayres, from the University of Warwick, and Professor Ala Szczepura, from Imperial College, London.


  • Click here to go to BBC London Online

    Click here to go to BBC Southampton Online
    See also:

    01 Oct 01 | Health
    25 Sep 01 | Health
    11 Sep 01 | Health
    29 Sep 99 | Health
    Internet links:


    The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

    Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


    E-mail this story to a friend

    Links to more Health stories

    © BBC ^^ Back to top

    News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
    South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
    Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
    Programmes