BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: Health
Front Page 
World 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Background Briefings 
Medical notes 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Wednesday, 14 February, 2001, 15:42 GMT
CJD compensation announced
CJD brain
CJD causes major changes to the brain
Health Secretary Alan Milburn has announced that families of the victims of the brain disease vCJD will receive 25,000 as an interim compensation payment.

The government promised to compensate victims of the human form of mad cow disease after the long-running inquiry into the BSE crisis.

The money will be paid to families immediately while full compensation settlements for each person are decided.

According to latest figures, 86 people have died from definite or probable vCJD and another eight suspected sufferers are still alive.

The money will go to families of people who have died and those caring for a relative with the disease who is still alive.

The Phillips report into BSE criticised ministers and civil servants for failing to respond quickly enough to warnings that BSE in cattle could enter the food chain and infect humans.

Families' reaction

Solicitor David Body of Irwin Mitchell, the law firm representing families of vCJD victims, welcomed the announcement.

He said: "This interim payment will be made as soon as possible and will begin a round of negotiations between the government's lawyers and lawyers of the families to put in place a no fault scheme of compensation for the families designed to compensate losses and to meet needs.

"An interim payment of 25,000 is obviously the right step for the government to take at this time."

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE

CJD

Features

Background

CLICKABLE GUIDE

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

20 Oct 00 | Health
vCJD and BSE - the link
14 Jan 00 | Health
CJD treatment 'draws closer'
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories