BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Health  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
Medical notes
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
EDITIONS
Cash for condoms in developing world
condoms
Condoms are a weapon against the spread of Aids
The UK is contributing 25m to a fund to supply male and female condoms to the developing world.

The one-off payment to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is intended to reduce transmission rates of HIV.

Some of the money will also be spent on drugs to treat sexually-transmitted infections.

International Development Secretary Clare Short said: "The Aids pandemic is spreading at an alarming rate, with up to a quarter of all adults infected in some African countries.

"Access to safe contraception and reproductive health services for all is one of the international development targets and a core component of Britain's health strategy for the developing world."

Rising demand

The UNFPA had faced the prospect of being unable to meet a rising demand for barrier contraceptives in the developing world.

The UK Department for International Development (DFID) said: "A shortfall of 500,000 could lead to 360,000 unwanted pregnancies, 150,000 unsafe abortion, more than 800 maternal deaths, and 11,000 child deaths."

The UK already gives more than 15m to the UNFPA annually.

The Netherlands has also announced a similar extra grant of $39m.

Dr Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the fund, welcomed the donations.

He said: "It shows the commitment of the Netherlands and the UK to the right of women and men around the world to have access to reproductive health care and especially safe and effective methods of family planning."

In developing countries, according to the fund, six out of 10 couples now use some form of family planning, compared to one in 10 in the 1960s.

Demand for contraceptives is likely to grow by 40% between now and 2015.

Shortages have been reported in sub-Saharan African countries such as Ethiopia, Chad, DR Congo, Nigeria, Angola and Namibia.

However, even countries such as the Russian Federation have reported shortfalls.

The UN has pledged to make access to reproductive health care universal by 2015.

The UK is currently UNFPA's fourth largest annual donor.

See also:

01 Nov 00 | Health
19 Oct 00 | Health
29 Sep 00 | Health
22 Sep 00 | Health
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Health stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Health stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes