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Monday, April 19, 1999 Published at 10:12 GMT 11:12 UK


Greens launch Welsh manifesto

The Greens are hoping to become the assembly's "conscience"

Welsh Greens are hoping to secure at least one seat in the National Assembly for Wales by targeting the second vote that electors can cast on 6 May.

With policies aimed at sustainable local businesses, boosting public transport and promoting organic farming in Wales, the Greens are targeting the second or 'top-up' vote.


[ image:  ]
Candidates are standing for the Greens in all five of the party list regional seats which are based on the European election constituencies.

The Greens gained 11% of the vote in Wales in the 1989 European elections, and the party hopes to gain 7% of the proportional vote this time around.

At its manifesto launch in Cardiff, the party stated its aim to become "the conscience" of the National Assembly.

Spokesman Kevin Jakeway said Green Party policies could have a "dramatic effect" on the quality of life for people in Wales.

The party, he said, wanted the Welsh Development Agency to focus on local communities, developing businesses in town centres.


[ image: Kevin Jakeway: Calling for more investment in public transport]
Kevin Jakeway: Calling for more investment in public transport
Promoting positive investment in more rail and bus links, particularly rural bus services and the north Wales to Cardiff rail link are other key proposals.

Free bus fares for pensioners are also being pledged.

Efforts should also be made, the Greens said, to ensure a positive growth in the development of organic farming in Wales.

"We do have policies that ought to have a dramatic effect on all elements of society," said Mr Jakeway.

Local goods, locally produced, were a way of meeting local needs and would have direct benefits to communities, he added.

"There would be more local jobs, less traffic and pollution...better local shops, schools and childcare, with less crime."



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