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Friday, February 26, 1999 Published at 03:01 GMT


Support for silent exiles

Many of those forced out were involved in petty crime like joy-riding

By Northern Ireland Correspondent Denis Murray

A campaign has been launched in support of people from Northern Ireland who have been forced out of the province into exile in England and elsewhere.


Denis Murray: Over 100 people have been exiled since the Good Friday Agreement
Supporters say the hundreds of people who have been intimidated out by paramilitaries on both sides are the silent victims of the troubles.

The new campaign is backed by peace organisations based in Britain and in Ireland, north and south.

Return for evidence

Over the 30 years of the Northern Ireland troubles hundreds of people have been forced into exile by republican and loyalist paramilitaries, often young men believed to be involved in joyriding or other petty crime.

Chris Hudson of the Peace Train Organisation says it is writing to MPs, members of the Northern Ireland Assembly and the Irish parliament lobbying them on the issue.

Mr Hudson said it was not acceptable that paramilitary organisations that claimed to have ceasefires were continuing such intimidation.

One family is fighting back. Sam McQuillan, a loyalist now living somewhere in England, told the BBC he is determined to return and give evidence against other loyalists who assaulted his son because of his political opinions.





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