Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education



Front Page

World

UK

UK Politics

Business

Sci/Tech

Health

Education

Sport

Entertainment

Talking Point

In Depth

On Air

Archive
Feedback
Low Graphics
Help

Wednesday, May 12, 1999 Published at 18:09 GMT 19:09 UK


Allied attack 'kills Iraqis'

Allied planes regularly patrol Iraqi airspace

Twelve people have been killed as Western warplanes bombed civilian targets in northern Iraq, according to Iraqi officials.

An Iraqi military spokesman, quoted by the official Iraqi News Agency INA, said: "American and British planes committed yet another crime against civilians when they bombed their tents in Nineveh province killing 12 citizens, injuring others and killing 200 head of livestock."


[ image:  ]
The attacks were said to have taken place near the city of Mosul.

The Combined Task Force of US and British forces, based at Incirlik in southern Turkey, said earlier that US planes had bombed several Iraqi missile sites on Wednesday in the northern "no-fly" zone.

This was the fourth time in a week that targets near Mosul have been hit by planes.

Iraqi officials have also said a strike on Sunday in the south of the country killed four people.

Regular attacks

US and British planes patrolling air-exclusion zones over northern and southern Iraq have fired on Iraqi forces on the ground several times a week since December, when the allies carried out four days of intensive bombing.

Iraq does not recognise the legitimacy of either of the air exclusion zones which are not covered by a specific United Nations resolution.

The allies imposed the no-fly zones unilaterally, saying this was to protect Shi'a and Kurdish minorities in Iraq.

But the US and Britain argue that they are empowered to act by more general resolutions passed after the Gulf War in 1991.

International attention has drifted away from the Iraqi crisis since the Nato air campaign against Yugoslavia began in March but the low-level military conflict continues alongside a political stalemate.

The United Nations programme which is supposed to monitor the destruction of Iraqi weapons systems is in tatters and there is no sign that international sanctions against Iraq will come to an end as long as President Saddam Hussein remains in power.



Advanced options | Search tips




Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage |




LATEST NEWS

ROAD TO THE BRINK

FORCES AND FIREPOWER

DECISION MAKERS AND DIPLOMACY

TEXTS AND TRANSCRIPTS

INTERNET LINKS





Internet Links


Iraqi UN Mission

US Air Force: Response to Iraq


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.