Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education



Front Page

World

UK

UK Politics

Business

Sci/Tech

Health

Education

Sport

Entertainment

Talking Point
On Air
Feedback
Low Graphics
Help

Tuesday, January 26, 1999 Published at 22:19 GMT


Renewed clashes over Iraq

The US has admitted that a stray missile may have hit Basra

President Saddam Hussein has vowed to avenge victims of the US missile strikes on the southern Iraqi city of Basra as the US continued to carry out strikes against military targets in the no-fly zones.


Rageh Omaar: "Iraqi military bases face serious attacks"
Washington confirmed that there had been five more attacks on Iraqi military targets by US fighters patrolling the northern and southern no-fly zones.

US forces fired on three Iraqi targets near the northern city of Mosul and air-raid sirens sounded twice in Basra where relief operations are continuing in a neighbourhood hit by a missile on Monday.


[ image: The Iraqis say children were among the injured in Basra]
The Iraqis say children were among the injured in Basra
The BBC's Rageh Omaar, the only western correspondent in Mosul, reported that two US aircraft flying at high altitude passed over the city on several bombing runs.

Up to three separate strikes against unseen targets were made though he could not confirm what they had hit or the extent of the damage. Iraqi anti-aircraft guns only opened fire twice in response to the attacks.

Iraq says at least 11 civilians were killed in attacks on Basra on Monday. The US concedes that one of its missiles may have been responsible for the deaths.


Humphrey Hawksley reports from Baghdad with the latest developments
In his address, President Saddam accused Arab states of being "accomplices of the devil," as the US and UK continued monitoring the no-fly zones from Iraq's neighbours.

Although he did not single out Saudi Arabia or Kuwait, the two states were named in an Iraqi parliament debate on responses to the latest missile attacks.


Eyewitness: Rageh Omaar reports from Mosul
MPs accused Saudi and Kuwaiti leaders of taking part in the US-led attacks on Iraq in December, and called for a tribunal to try them.

Some MPs went further. "I call upon the National Assembly members to adopt a recommendation to revoke recognition of Kuwait, demarcation of borders and to confront the Kuwaiti-Saudi conspiracy," said Ahmed Mohammed al-Atroushi.

US 'may have hit' Basra

There are no independent reports of what happened in Basra, but journalists who reached the city saw several damaged buildings, wrecked vehicles and people apparently in shock.

Access to casualties was not allowed but the BBC's Correspondent in Baghdad, Humphrey Hawksley, says authorities may allow United Nations observers in.

US Commander of Gulf forces General Anthony Zinni said: "We have the possibility that one missile may have been errant".

The US deeply regretted any civilian casualties in Basra, he said, but added that President Saddam Hussein had initiated the action.



Advanced options | Search tips




Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage |




LATEST NEWS

ROAD TO THE BRINK

FORCES AND FIREPOWER

DECISION MAKERS AND DIPLOMACY

TEXTS AND TRANSCRIPTS

INTERNET LINKS