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Friday, February 5, 1999 Published at 18:49 GMT


Monica Lewinsky's evidence

Monica Lewinsky: Five hours of testimony

Excerpts from Monica Lewinsky's Deposition to House Managers in the impeachment trial:

Visiting the White House

House manager Question: After leaving the White House and going to the Pentagon, did you continue to visit the President?

A. Yes.

Q. How were these meetings arranged?

A. Through Ms Currie.

Q. Would you call her and set the meeting up, or would she call you on behalf of the President and set the meeting up?

A. It varied.

Q. Both situations occurred?

A. Correct.

Q. Now, Ms Currie is the President's- that's Betty Currie, we're talking about, the President's secretary?

A. Yes.

Q. Why was this done? Why was that procedure used?

A. It was my understanding that Ms. Currie took care of the President's guests who were coming to see him, making those arrangements.

Q. Was, uh - was this - were these visits done sort of off the record, so to speak, so it wouldn't necessarily be a record?

A. I believe so.

Q. In other words, you wouldn't be shown on Betty Currie's calendar or schedule book for the President?

A. I don't know.

Q. Did--who suggested this type of arrangement for setting up meetings?

A. I believe the President did.

Mixed feelings for the President

Q. Okay. All right. Let's go forward another week or so to December the 11th and a lunch that you had with Vernon Jordan, I believe, in his office.

A. Yes.

Q. What was the purpose of that meeting?

A. Uh, it was to discuss my job situation.

Q. And what, what--how was that discussed?

A. Uh, Mr. Jordan gave me a list of three names and suggested that I contact these people in a letter that I should cc him on, and that's what I did.

Q. During this meeting, did he make any comments about your status as a friend of the President?

A. Yes.

Q. What did he say?

A. In one of his remarks, he said something about me being a friend of the President.

Q. And did you respond?

A. Yes.

Q. How?

A. I said that I didn't, uh - I think I - my grand jury testimony, I know I talked about this, so it's probably more accurate. My memory right now is I said something about, uh, seeing him more as, uh, a man than as a President, and I treated him accordingly.

Q. Did you express your frustration to Mr Jordan with, uh, with the President?

A. I expressed that sometimes I had frustrations with him, yes.

Q. And what was his response to you about, uh--after you talked about the President?

A. Uh, he sort of jokingly said to me, You know what your problem is, and don't deny it--you're in love with him. But it was a sort of light-hearted nature.

Q. Did you--did you have a response to that?

A. I probably blushed or giggled or something.

Q. Do you still have feelings for the President?

A. I have mixed feelings.

Breakfast with Jordan

Q. Let me direct your attention to your meeting with Vernon Jordan on December the 31st of 1997. Was that to go back and talk about the job again?

A. Little bit, but the--the--for me, the point of that meeting was I had gotten to a point where Linda Tripp wasn't returning my phone calls, and so I felt that I needed to devise some way, that somehow--to kind of cushion the shock of what would happen if Linda Tripp testified all the facts about my relationship, since I had never disclosed that to the President.
So that was sort of my intention in meeting with Mr. Jordan, was hoping that I could give a little information and that would get passed on.

Q. This was at a meeting for breakfast at the Park Hyatt Hotel?

A. Yes.

Q. Were just the two of you present?

A. Yes.

Q. Did you discuss other things, other than Linda Tripp and your job search? Specifically about some notes that you had at your apartment?

A. Oh, yes. Um, well, I mean, that really was in relation to discussing Linda Tripp. So--

Q. And the Jones lawyers, too. Was that right?

A. Um, I--I don't know that I discussed the Jones lawyers. If I've testified that I discussed the Jones lawyers, then I did, but--

Q. Okay. Well, tell us about the notes.

A. Well, the--sort of the--I don't know what to call it, but the story that I gave to Mr. Jordan was that I was trying to sort of alert to him that, gee, maybe Linda Tripp might be saying these things about me having a relationship with the President, and right now, I'm explaining this to you.
These aren't the words that I used or how I said it to him, and that, you know, maybe she had seen drafts of notes, trying to obviously give an excuse as to how Linda Tripp could possibly know about my relationship with the President without me having been the one to have told her. So that's what I said to him.

Q. And what was his response?

A. I think it was something like go home and make sure--oh, something about a--I think he asked me if they were notes from the President to me, and I said no.
I know I've testified to this. I stand by that testimony, and I'm just recalling it, that I said no, they were draft notes or notes that I sent to the President, and then I believe he said something like, well, go home and make sure they're not there.

Q. And what did you do when you went home?

A. I went home and I searched through some of my papers, and--and the drafts of notes I found, I sort of--I got rid of some of the notes that day.

Q. So you threw them away?

A. Mm-hmm.

THE REPORTER: Is that a `yes'?

THE WITNESS: Yes. Sorry.



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In this section

Lewinsky testimony - video extracts

Monica Lewinsky's evidence

Impeachment debate: Key quotes

The Monica tapes: Confiding in a friend

Highlights: More evidence

Lewinsky urged Tripp to lie

President's secretary was reluctant witness

Highlights: The video

The infamous dress

Secret meetings with Clinton

Touching moments