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Page last updated at 07:34 GMT, Wednesday, 13 August 2008 08:34 UK

Stadium expansion tests conducted

A stadium in the Isle of Man's capital is to undergo building tests to find out whether it is suitable to convert into a larger venue.

The King George V Bowl currently holds about 3,000 spectators but this could be increased by 50% under plans to turn it into a stadium for national events.

Bore holes are to be sunk at the venue to check ground conditions.

Councillors hope to have the expansion done by 2011, when the island will host the Commonwealth Youth Games.

According to David Christian, Douglas Borough Council leader, the work is essential because of the scale of the proposed scheme.

'Major excavations'

"Before we start doing major excavations we want to know exactly what is down there because we don't want to start digging it up and then suddenly find we are walloped with a far greater cost because we haven't done our homework," he said.

"We will be putting considerable weight in relation to putting seating around all the terraced areas that are there.

"They would all have to be stabilised, seating put on, possibly to the capacity of 4,500 people so we need to know exactly what is under there.

A lot of the area around the stadium used to be a rubbish tip and there is concern waste from a power station is buried underneath the pitch.




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