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Last Updated: Tuesday, 8 November 2005, 14:02 GMT
Students in 11,000-year-old find
Antler found by Manx students
The antler is now being cleaned, examined and re-constructed
Students on the Isle of Man have discovered the antler of a giant deer which lived about 11,000 years ago.

The Department of Education said the historic find was made among the cliffs near Kirk Michael.

The students, doing a history degree at the Isle of Man College, were on a field trip led by Peter Davey, Director of the Centre for Manx Studies.

Dr Davey, also Reader in Archaeology at the University of Liverpool, described the discovery as "absolutely amazing".

'Orange streak'

He added: "Of all the times I've been out here with groups of students to demonstrate the structure of the deposits in the cliffs, most times the students only see sediments.

"I just scraped the surface of the fallen cliff section, which was in a block that had recently slid down the cliff, and uncovered an orange streak which on further investigation turned out to be antler."

The antler was from an animal similar to the skeleton on display in the Manx Museum. Such remains are found on the Isle of Man from time to time.

Although the exact age of the antler has yet to be determined, the position of the remains indicate that the deer - an Irish Elk - lived about 11,000 years ago.

The antler is now being cleaned, examined and re-constructed by Dr Philippa Tomlinson of the Centre for Manx Studies, a specialist in fossil and archaeological bone and plant remains.




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