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Monday, 9 October, 2000, 12:53 GMT 13:53 UK
Profile: Marko Milosevic
Marko Milosevic with his wife and mother
Marko Milosevic, with his wife and mother
Marko Milosevic, the 26-year-old son of the former Yugoslav president, built up an extensive business empire in his father's home town of Pozarevac.

It gave him great wealth but made him an object of scorn among ordinary Serbs.

Following his father's fall from power he wasted no time in leaving the country with his wife Daniela and son Marko, heading first for Moscow where his uncle Borislav is ambassador.

It is not known where or whether he plans a permanent exile, but to his enemies at home it looks as though he is on the run.

Notorious for wild behaviour and a playboy image, Marko left town in a convoy of three jeeps - at characteristic high speed, said witnesses.

Conspiracy theory

His business interests included an amusement complex, Bambipark, and a disco club, Madonna, both of which closed because of poor visitor numbers.

He also owned a bakery and a computer shop, Cybernet Communications, which were ransacked by protesters in the unrest leading to Mr Milosevic's defeat.

Marko's luxurious perfume shop in central Belgrade, named Scandal, was looted by rampaging protesters. Reports described the scornful graffiti left by looters: "Go complain to your Dad".

Marko Milosevic's opponents say his main business interests centred around the smuggling of drugs, petrol and cigarettes.

His name has even been linked by some to the long list of suspects in the killing of Arkan, the Serbian paramilitary leader assassinated in a Belgrade hotel in January, who was a business rival.

Although linked with alleged illegal dealings and physical intimidation, he was said to have commanded the loyalty of the police and local authorities.

Many in Serbia are angry that he has left the country, and say he is trying to avoid possible criminal charges.

Another theory for his sudden departure is that underworld figures in Serbia may have been hoping to settle old scores.

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See also:

09 Oct 00 | Europe
Serbs shown war crimes film
08 Oct 00 | Europe
Yugoslavia looks to the future
08 Oct 00 | Europe
Analysis: Milosevic's trials
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