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Page last updated at 20:57 GMT, Sunday, 25 April 2010 21:57 UK

Landslide victory for Hungary's conservative opposition

Hungarian woman casts her ballot in a polling station in Budapest,
More than 100 seats were at stake in Sunday's vote

Hungary's conservative opposition party Fidesz has won a two-thirds general election victory, second round results have confirmed.

With 99.22% of votes counted, the party had nearly 68% of the popular vote and 263 of the 386 seats in parliament, the national election committee said.

Almost a third of the seats were left to be decided on Sunday following the first round two weeks ago.

Fidesz promised to create jobs, lower taxes and reduce bureaucracy.

The ruling Socialists were in second place on 15% (59 seats), the far-right Jobbik had 12% (47 seats) and a new Green party called Politics Can be Different had 4.1% (16 seats).

One seat went to an independent.

Fidesz leader Viktor Orban is set to become prime minister. Mr Orban welcomed the result, saying he would rule "with humility".

He told supporters: "We saw a revolution in the polling stations."

The entire leadership of the Socialist party, who had governed for the past eight years, tendered its resignation after the results were revealed.

The second round of the election was fought in 57 constituencies where no single candidate had won more than 50% of the vote in the first round.

A two-thirds majority will give Fidesz the chance to change the constitution, the BBC's Nick Thorpe reports from Budapest.

The Socialists had argued that they had created 100,000 jobs, navigated the ship of state safely through a serious economic crisis and improved law and order.



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