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Page last updated at 13:01 GMT, Wednesday, 24 February 2010

Turkey methane explosion in mine killed 13

Relatives wait outside the site of a mine explosion in north-west Turkey, 23 February 2010
Relatives gathered outside the mine following the blast

A methane explosion at a coal mine in north-west Turkey killed 13 workers - not 17 as earlier reported - Turkish officials have said.

They said 18 people were in hospital, with four in critical condition.

The blast on Tuesday caused an underground chamber to collapse at a mine 20km (12 miles) outside Dursunbey, in Balikesir province.

Some 33 workers were rescued after the explosion, which came two months after a blast at a mine in Bursa killed 19.

The mine's owner said it had buried the miners nearly 820ft (250m) below the surface.

Labour Minister Omer Dincer said officials had initially overstated the death toll because four bodies had been counted twice.

Seventeen workers were killed in a similar blast at the mine in 2006, Turkey's Anatolia news agency reported.

The safety record of Turkey's coal mining industry lags behind that of most industrial nations, analysts say.

The country's worst mining disaster was in 1992, when 270 miners were killed near the Black Sea port of Zonguldak.



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