BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Europe
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 



The BBC's John Kay
"It is reported to have hit a hotel"
 real 28k

Capt. John Hutchinson, Concorde Pilot
"Concorde remains the safest plane to fly"
 real 28k

Tuesday, 25 July, 2000, 16:25 GMT 17:25 UK
Concorde Paris crash kills 113

A Concorde jet bound for New York has crashed minutes after taking off from Paris, killing 113 people.

The Air France aircraft crashed in flames into a Relais Bleu hotel in the town of Gonesse north of the capital, two minutes after take-off from Charles de Gaulle airport.

Relatives' helpline
+33 1 53 83 45 00
The French Interior Ministry has confirmed that 100 passengers and nine crew were killed. At least four people on the ground have also lost their lives.

Air France said all the passengers on board were German, travelling on a flight specially chartered by German tour operator Deilmann.

Crash scene
Emergency services rushed to the scene
They were on their way to pick up a cruise ship in New York bound for Ecuador.

Eyewitnesses said the aircraft's left-side engine was on fire, and that it was not able to gain sufficient altitude before it crashed.

"When the plane crashed, there was a huge ball of fire and an enormous plume of black smoke," one said.

Another told reporters the annex of the hotel was "totally in flames".

Cracks found

The crash is the first of the supersonic jet built by Britain and France.

It comes a day after British Airways confirmed hairline cracks had been discovered in the wings of all seven of its Concorde fleet.

Concorde facts
First plane flew in 1969
13 supersonic jets operated by BA and Air France
Flies above turbulence at almost 60,000 feet
Crosses Atlantic at 1,350mph in less than 3.5 hours
The Concorde has been considered among the world's safest planes.

Its only major scare came in 1979, when a bad landing blew out a plane's tyres. The incident led to a design modification.

The first of the aircraft flew in 1969. Air France and British Airways operate 13 of the supersonic jets.

Air France officials have said in the past that their current fleet is fit to fly safely until 2007.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

25 Jul 00 | UK
Q&A: Cracks in Concorde
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Europe stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Europe stories