BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Europe
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Tuesday, 22 August, 2000, 07:47 GMT 08:47 UK
Dinosaur footprints suggest Afro-Italian link

Scientists in a remote area of southern Italy have discovered a large number of dinosaur footprints which they say suggests the Italian peninsula was once joined to Africa.

The researchers from the University of Ferrara found sixty footprints which they believe were made by a large herd of iguanodons, which lived a-hundred-and-thirty million years ago and were five metres high and nine metres long.

Conventional theories suggest that what is now southern Italy was once an archipelago of small islands.

But the head of the team, Professor Alfonso Bosellini, said large numbers of dinosaurs of this size could not have existed on small islands.

He said the footprints were comparable to others already discovered in north Africa.

From the newsroom of the BBC World Service

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
Links to more Europe stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Europe stories