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Amanda Knox's lawyer: Kercher trial evidence 'flawed'

Carlo Della Vedova, Amanda Knox
The jury is expected to begin deliberations this week

The evidence against a woman accused of killing British exchange student Meredith Kercher in Italy was "flawed", her lawyer has told a court.

Carlo Dalla Vedova suggested DNA traces said to link Amanda Knox to the scene of the stabbing in Perugia in November 2007 were too low to be relied on.

Miss Knox, 22, and her former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 25, deny charges of murder and sexual violence.

The jury is expected to begin its deliberations on Friday.

Rudy Guede, 22, from Ivory Coast, was jailed for 30 years after he was convicted in a separate trial but has launched an appeal.

'Many doubts'

Miss Kercher, 21, from Coulsdon, south London, was found dead in her bedroom after what prosecutors maintain was a drug-induced sex game.

But Mr Dalla Vedova contended no evidence had been presented to show Miss Knox, Mr Sollecito and Guede had planned an attack on Kercher.

In her defence, Miss Knox, from Seattle, testified that she spent the night of the murder with Mr Sollecito at his flat, where she said they smoked marijuana, had sex and watched a movie.

In his closing arguments in the trial, Mr Dalla Vedova told the court: "There are still many doubts".

He said claims Miss Knox's DNA was found on the handle of the knife alleged to have been used to kill Miss Kercher should be discounted.

The defence has argued the shape of the knife did not match Ms Kercher's wounds.

Mr Dalla Vedova also dismissed a prosecution claim that his client resented Miss Kercher for allegedly saying she was promiscuous.



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