Languages
Page last updated at 12:19 GMT, Wednesday, 25 November 2009

Barroso gets new EU Commission team

European Commission president Jose Manuel Barroso
Mr Barroso is pleased that women will get one-third of the new jobs

Centre-right politicians dominate the list of new EU commissioners from the 27 member states, who are expected to take office in late January.

European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso has received nominations from the 27 states and now has to decide which posts they will get.

Twelve of the 27 commissioners come from the main centre-right grouping, the European People's Party (EPP).

There are nine women on the list - one more than in the current Commission.

Just one post has been decided so far, apart from Mr Barroso's - that of Baroness Catherine Ashton, the new EU foreign affairs supremo, who will be a Commission vice-president.

The commissioners-designate face tough questioning from Euro MPs at European Parliament hearings in January before they can take office. The MEPs' approval is required for them to be confirmed.

Gavin Hewitt
The most important part of the EU is the single market and power lies in regulating that
Gavin Hewitt
BBC Europe Editor

The list includes several commissioners nominated to serve a second five-year term, including Finland's Olli Rehn (enlargement commissioner), Viviane Reding from Luxembourg (information and media commissioner) and Neelie Kroes from the Netherlands (competition commissioner).

There is expected to be tough bargaining over the major economic portfolios, like trade, monetary affairs and competition.

France's candidate Michel Barnier - a former agriculture minister - is tipped to get the internal market job.

Mr Barroso told MEPs on Tuesday that he would split up the current justice and internal affairs job into its two parts and would also create a new post - that of climate change commissioner.

"I have some good news to give today. The next commission will have nine women, one more than at present," he said. "A week ago we only had three women [proposed]."

The new Commission's political composition reflects the outcome of the June European elections, when centre-right parties did especially well and support for the centre-left slumped, while the liberal bloc remained stable.

The officials are nominated by the member states' governments - one from each country.

The list of nominees is as follows:

Austria - Johannes Hahn (EPP)

Belgium - Karel De Gucht (ELDR - liberal)

Bulgaria - Rumiana Jeleva (EPP)

Cyprus - Androulla Vassiliou (ELDR)

Czech Republic - Stefan Fuele (S&D - centre-left)

Denmark - Connie Hedegaard (EPP)

Estonia - Siim Kallas (ELDR)

Finland - Olli Rehn (ELDR)

France - Michel Barnier (EPP)

Germany - Guenther Oettinger (EPP)

Greece - Maria Damanaki (S&D)

Hungary - Laszlo Andor (S&D)

Republic of Ireland - Maire Geoghegan Quinn (ELDR)

Italy - Antonio Tajani (EPP)

Latvia - Andris Piebalgs (EPP)

Lithuania - Algirdas Semeta (EPP)

Luxembourg - Viviane Reding (EPP)

Malta - John Dalli (EPP)

The Netherlands - Neelie Kroes (ELDR)

Poland - Janusz Lewandowski (EPP)

Portugal - Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso (EPP)

Romania - Dacian Ciolos (EPP)

Slovakia - Maros Sefcovic (S&D)

Slovenia - Janez Potocnik (ELDR)

Spain - Joaquin Almunia (S&D)

Sweden - Cecilia Malmstroem (ELDR)

UK - Baroness Catherine Ashton (S&D)



Print Sponsor


RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit
Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific