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Page last updated at 12:45 GMT, Wednesday, 14 October 2009 13:45 UK

Turkey, Armenia split on new ties

Armenian foreign minister Edward Nalbandian (front L) shakes hands with Turkish foreign minister Ahmet Davutoglu
Turkey and Armenia have agreed to reopen their shared border

The historic deal signed this week by Turkey and Armenia to restore relations after decades of hostility has provoked a mixed reaction from the press on both sides.

Armenian papers felt that Turkey had escaped the issue of the mass killings and deportation of Armenians by the Ottoman Empire in 1915, although one journalist said that the normalisation of ties was inevitable.

The tone in the Turkish press was more positive but commentators remained cautious on the subject of the ethnic-Armenian enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh.

Armenian press

168 ZHAM

If we accept the assurances of the authorities who say that these protocols are advantageous for Armenia... then parliament will ratify them speedily. If we accept... [opposition] warnings that the protocols are "destructive", then they need to be ratified quickly and highlight that... the process is sabotaged because of Turkey. In any case, the situation is not advantageous for us.

OPPOSITION ARMENIAN NATIONAL CONGRESS MEMBER LEVON ZURABYAN IN ZHAMANAK

So what does the Zurich process mean? Officially, it was that Turkey is able to halt international recognition of the Armenian genocide... and in exchange, Armenia benefits from the opening of roads. Although this was the official outcome, in fact something worse happened: Turkey got what it needed, ie both sides arranged to discuss historical issues bilaterally, and agreed that the international community will not consider the genocide issue any more.

ARMEN HAKOBYAN IN HAYOTS ASHKHARH

It became clear a short while after [the signing] that Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu tried... to introduce wording that was unacceptable to Armenia in an official statement following the signature... The resourceful games of "Turkish diplomacy" proved unsuccessful in the face of Armenia's openness and inflexibility and no statements were made after the signing... it can therefore be said that the protocols evened out as a draw for both sides, but to Armenia's benefit.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF ARAM ABRAHAMYAN IN ARAVOT

Armenian-Turkish ties will be normalised anyway - this is a logical development. Any responsible leader of Armenia and Turkey will do their utmost to try and achieve this. This may not happen today or in the coming months. But if this process is suspended now, then when it resumes those people who now form the opposition in our countries... will make every effort to use this process to achieve their own political goals.

Turkish press

MEHMET KAMIS IN ZAMAN

The status-quo is changing in and around Turkey... The old order, based on antagonism, is being replaced by a brand new approach, based on friendship, co-operation and even fraternity.

FEHMI KORU IN YENI SAFAK

The protocols aim to finally end the conflict between Turkey and Armenia. However, the rapprochement between these two countries is just a small part of a bigger picture... The real aim is to turn the Caucasus, of which Armenia is an important country, into a "peaceful zone". And for that, Yerevan and Baku must come closer.

YALCIN DOGAN IN HURRIYET

Azerbaijan is indispensable to us. This is why this protocol will wait. The protocol will come into force when the Armenians end the occupation of Nagorno-Karabakh.

CUNEYT ARCAYUREK IN CUMHURIYET

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has given a guarantee to the Turkish and Azeri people that if the Karabakh issue is not resolved in a way that is acceptable to Azerbaijan, the Turkish parliament will not approve the protocol and the border will not be opened...! They say that today but will the Erdogan government be able to resist the pressure that will come from the US or even from Russia and France to open the gate?

MEHMET ALI BIRAND IN POSTA

Armenian President Serge Sarkisian coming to the national [football] match [in Turkey] today is quite important... If he had not come, the protocol signed in Zurich would have been dealt a big blow... The Armenian president has taken a very brave step and he is signalling that he will continue to take steps like these.

BBC Monitoringselects and translates news from radio, television, press, news agencies and the internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages. It is based in Caversham, UK, and has several bureaux abroad.



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