Languages
Page last updated at 16:47 GMT, Monday, 31 August 2009 17:47 UK

Putin condemns Nazi-Soviet pact

Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov signs the Nazi-Soviet pact as his German counterpart Joachim Von Ribbentrop (left), and Stalin look on, Moscow, 23 August 1939
The pact led to the carving-up of Poland and eastern Europe

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin has condemned the Nazi-Soviet pact signed a week before Germany's 1939 invasion of Poland as "immoral".

In a piece for the Polish paper Gazeta Wyborcza, he also expressed sorrow over the massacre of Polish army officers by Soviet forces at Katyn in 1940.

His words are seen as a bid to ease tensions with Poland over World War II.

But he also argued the Munich agreement signed by France and Britain wrecked efforts to build an anti-Nazi alliance.

A year earlier France and England signed a well-known agreement with Hitler in Munich, destroying all hope for the creation of a joint front for the fight against fascism
Vladimir Putin
Russian prime minister

Mr Putin is among several statesmen attending a service in the Polish port city of Gdansk on Tuesday to mark the 70th anniversary of Poland's invasion.

"Our duty is to remove the burden of distrust and prejudice left from the past in Polish-Russian relations," said Mr Putin in the article, which was also published on the Russian government website.

"Our duty... is to turn the page and start to write a new one."

Katyn regret

Memories of the 1939 pact - in which the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany essentially agreed to carve up Poland and the Baltic States between them - have long soured Moscow's relations with Poland and other east European states.

Joachim von Ribbentrop signing the ratification of the Nazi-Soviet pact in Berlin, 28 September 1939

Within a month of the pact being signed, Soviet troops had invaded and occupied parts of eastern Poland.

"It is possible to condemn - and with good reason - the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact concluded in August 1939," wrote Mr Putin, referring to the two foreign ministers who signed the pact at the Kremlin.

It was clear today, he said, that any form of agreement with the Nazi regime was "unacceptable from the moral point of view and had no chance of being realised".

"But after all," he added, "a year earlier France and England signed a well-known agreement with Hitler in Munich, destroying all hope for the creation of a joint front for the fight against fascism."

The Munich Agreement of September 1938, widely seen as the low point of British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's policy of appeasement, allowed Germany to annex Czechoslovakia's Sudetenland region.

Mr Putin added that Russian people understood "all too well the acute emotions of Poles in connection with Katyn".

In 1940 Soviet secret police massacred more than 21,000 army officers and intellectuals on Stalin's direct orders in the Katyn forest near the city of Smolensk.

Moscow only took responsibility for the killings in 1990, having previously blamed the massacre on the Nazis.



Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Modern views on the Nazi-Soviet pact
26 Aug 09 |  Europe
Stalin's bid for a new world order
25 Aug 09 |  Europe
Media build up to World War II
24 Aug 09 |  Europe
Viewpoint: The Nazi-Soviet Pact
21 Aug 09 |  Europe
Pact that set the scene for war
21 Aug 09 |  Europe
Russia acts against 'false' history
24 Jul 09 |  Europe

RELATED BBC LINKS

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC navigation

BBC © 2013 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific