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Page last updated at 21:59 GMT, Thursday, 20 August 2009 22:59 UK

Polish army chief quits amid row

By Adam Easton
BBC News, Warsaw

File photo of Polish troops in Afghanistan
Poland currently has some 2,000 troops serving in Afghanistan

The head of the Polish army has resigned after a dispute in which he accused the government of failing to properly equip troops in Afghanistan.

Lt Gen Waldemar Skrzypczak also said ministry officials' knowledge of war was limited to the movies.

He made his comments after the death of a Polish officer earlier this month in an ambush in Afghanistan.

Poland has 2,000 troops in the country as part of the Nato-led International Security Assistance Force.

The dispute involving Gen Skrzypczak became public following this month's battle between Polish troops and insurgents.

Four soldiers were wounded in the clash.

Initial inquiries found that the unit had not received prompt back-up owing to equipment shortages.

Gen Skrzypczak publicly accused the defence ministry of incompetence and failing to provide his troops with modern helicopters and other military hardware.

He resigned after the defence minister, Bogdan Klich, told a news conference that the general had admitted his criticisms were a mistake.

Gen Skrzypczak said he stood by his remarks.

He said his only mistake was to go public as the body of the dead officer was being flown home.



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