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Page last updated at 15:45 GMT, Monday, 10 August 2009 16:45 UK

Majorca voices: A nervous island

Tourists stand near the evacuated part of Playa de Can Pere Antoni, in Palma de Majorca
Some of the beach-front area in Palma was cordoned off on Sunday

After Sunday's three bomb explosions on the Spanish island of Majorca, locals and tourists have been describing their sense of fear in the wake of the blasts.

It is the second spate of bombings to hit the holiday destination in under two weeks.

Here two local residents and one tourist describe the nervous atmosphere on the island.

LUCIA GONZALEZ, 29, PALMA, MAJORCA, SPAIN

I am feeling so upset after these latest bombings.

I was having lunch with a friend at Plaza Major - the place where the third bomb was found - on Sunday afternoon.

At around 1600, police came into the restaurant and told us to leave quickly.

Lucia Gonzalez
It is a worrying time for us. I don't understand why these radicals are targeting our island
Lucia Gonzalez

People became very nervous and we were quite scared so we just went straight home.

There are lots of police on the streets today and there are police helicopters flying around overhead.

Security is also a lot tighter in many places now.

In my workplace, which is right down at the port, we have to show our ID going in and out, which we never really had to do before.

There's a general sense of nervousness around the place.

The streets are still quite crowded and people are going about their business, but everyone is kind of checking each other out, especially people wearing backpacks or anything like that.

It is a worrying time for us. I don't understand why these radicals are targeting our island.

We are a peaceful people and we are being targeted by assassins.

ANDREW SCHMIDT, 31, PALMA, MAJORCA, SPAIN / LEEDS, ENGLAND

Andrew Schmidt and his wife Rachel

There is a real sense of caution here in the wake of Sunday's bombs.

My wife and I are currently staying at the port of Portixol in Palma and the strip of restaurants from where people were evacuated on Sunday is visible from our hotel room.

At 1630, plain clothed officers worked their way around the port to our hotel and asked everyone to move away from the restaurant and pool, which has a one-way route lined with parked cars.

Police with sniffer dogs quickly and proficiently checked the area for further devices and the all clear was given some 30 minutes later.

We decided to remain indoors at our hotel today in an attempt to avoid the tourist hotspots in Palma and to ensure our safety.

I have been here three times, but may reconsider returning now because of these bombings, which is a shame because that is what these people [Eta] are trying to achieve
Andrew Schmidt

There is a noticeable police presence today, with Civil Guard cars and helicopters patrolling the area.

It is also much quieter than it was before the latest bombings.

The feeling among fellow tourists now is to lay low and confine ourselves to the relative safety of our hotels.

We were scheduled to return to the UK today anyway, but to be honest I will be happy to leave.

I have been here three times, but may reconsider returning now because of these bombings, which is a shame because that is what these people [Eta] are obviously trying to achieve.

But I would be a lot more concerned about my safety now were I to return in future, which is sad for the local people, who rely so heavily on tourism.

JONATHAN CECIL, 37, PALMA, MAJORCA, SPAIN

We were having lunch at a restaurant called Enco near the La Rigoletta area of the port on Sunday, when the national police and civil guard told us to leave the building.

A bomb later exploded in the toilet at the back of the restaurant.

Jonathan Cecil
The bomb just caused panic rather than damage, which was obviously the main aim
Jonathan Cecil

I went back there this morning to pay my bill, as I didn't want the terrorists to win.

There was not that much damage, just some cleaning up to do.

The bomb just caused panic rather than damage, which was obviously the main aim.

The owners said they expected to be open again within three days.

The beaches are quite quiet today, but that might also be because the weather hasn't been that great.

Some people will be nervous, but I am not personally, following these attacks. I moved here six weeks ago and I intend to stay here for some time.

I have lived in London and know that these attacks are all about creating a sense of fear.

I will keep going about my business.

I'm not sure how Eta expect to gain from this.

What I see are the benefits of calm, professional, Spanish security services.

They have my respect today.



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