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Page last updated at 14:29 GMT, Saturday, 11 April 2009 15:29 UK

More protests in Georgian capital

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Protests continue in Georgia

Anti-government protests are continuing for a third day in the Georgian capital, Tbilisi.

Roads in front of key buildings were blocked by groups of demonstrators who had camped out overnight.

They accuse President Mikhail Saakashvili of leading the country into a disastrous war with Russia, and want him to step down.

But there are signs that public support for the opposition-led campaign is dwindling, a BBC correspondent says.

Some 60,000 people turned out on Thursday for the first day of demonstrations - but far fewer were visible on Friday.

Organisers say they will not end their action until the president resigns.

Protesters in Tbilisi on 11 April 2009
The protesters want the president to resign over the war with Russia

They have launched a wave of civil disobedience and picketed government buildings.

On Saturday, several thousand people rallied outside parliament, while others blocked roads outside the state broadcaster and the office of the president.

Mr Saakashvili remains resolute in his determination to serve out his final term in office and has repeatedly offered dialogue with the opposition parties.

There are some signs that were the turn-out figures at the rallies to wane further on Saturday, some protest leaders might consider taking the president up on his offer, says the BBC's Tom Esslemont, from Tbilisi.



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