BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Europe
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 
Tuesday, 6 June, 2000, 14:58 GMT 15:58 UK
Poland sets up minority government
Leszek Balcerowicz
A besieged Leszek Balcerowicz has given up on the coalition
The Solidarity movement in Poland has set up a minority government after its centre-right partner, the Freedom Union, ended two weeks of talks on saving the coalition.

Solidarity said Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek would propose a team of new ministers to replace the five departing Freedom Union ministers within the next few days.

The Freedom Union (UW) objected to what it said was the slow pace of reform, as Poland tries to join the European Union.

Marian Krzaklewski
Solidarity was pushing for Marian Krzaklewski to become prime minister

Analysts say Poland will now endure months of political instablity as the Catholic right-of-centre AWS-Solidarity group struggles to keep its weak adminstration afloat in the face of attempts by the leftist opposition to precipitate early elections by calling no-confidence votes.

They also say the collapse of the 30-month coalition could affect negotiations on Poland's application to join the EU.

Last week, Foreign Minister Bronislaw Geremek, a key player in these negotiations, resigned.

EU negotiations

Mr Buzek himself has repeatedly said a minority government would be a bad option for Poland.

It is considered unlikely such a government could push next year's budget through parliament, and the former communist opposition could expect to win any resulting election.

On Tuesday the prime minister stressed that the government would "manage continuing business in hand", including European integration and economic development.

Another key point of contention between the former partners centred on who should replace Mr Buzek.

On Monday, Solidarity proposed that its political leader Marian Krzaklewski should replace Mr Buzek.

But the Freedom Union said it preferred a different candidate and said Mr Krzaklewski must give up his candidacy in this year's presidential election if he wanted to become premier.

The current government, Poland's longest serving since the return of democracy in 1989, is unpopular.

Despite high economic growth, the restructuring of industry has led to a large increase in unemployment over the last year.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Europe stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Europe stories