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Page last updated at 17:16 GMT, Thursday, 4 September 2008 18:16 UK

France shocked by images of war

By Emma Jane Kirby
BBC News, Paris

Staring out from a glossy eight-page spread in the latest edition of the magazine Paris Match, several Taleban fighters show off their trophies of war.

Funeral for French soldiers
The loss of the 10 soldiers in Afghanistan shocked France

Guns, walkie-talkies and even a wrist-watch are photographed - all spoils taken from the 10 French soldiers they killed in an ambush last month.

Accompanying the pictures is a long interview with the Taleban leader who calls himself Commander Farouki.

He claims they were tipped off about the French mission in their area and were able to prepare an ambush with 140 highly trained insurgents.

"If night hadn't fallen we'd have killed every one of the soldiers," he boasts.

He denies reports that other French paratroopers were captured and tortured but warns that every single French soldier found on Afghan soil will be killed.

Propaganda

On French radio today, Defence Minister Herve Morin criticised Paris Match for peddling Taleban propaganda.

"Should we really be doing the Taleban's propaganda for them?" he asked.

"The Taleban have understood perfectly that Western public opinion is probably the Achilles' heel of the international community present in Afghanistan."

A diplomat from the foreign ministry said it was the responsibility of the media to decide what they covered and how they did it, but added: "The reactions of the families of the servicemen speak for themselves".

"We can only imagine the pain that they felt when they saw these pictures, as well as that of the comrades of these men who are still in Afghanistan."

The French population can't accept to see any more soldiers killed
Jean Francois, Parisian

The father of one of the dead soldiers said he was shocked and hurt to see images of the "murderers" parading the personal effects of his son and comrades.

Although the freedom of the press is fiercely protected in France, in Paris many people were outraged at what they believed was irresponsibility on the part of Paris Match.

"It makes me sick," said one woman who was close to tears.

"I think about how the parents must feel, the sisters and the brothers… and really… I would hate to see this if this was my son."

Jean Francois, a financial adviser, agreed.

"This kind of report is horrible and unfair for the families," he said.

"The French population can't accept to see any more soldiers killed. French soldiers have to come back to France as soon as possible."

War opposed

A survey taken in April this year when President Nicolas Sarkozy announced he was sending another battalion of almost 800 soldiers to north-east Afghanistan showed that two-thirds of people here believe their country has no place in the Afghan conflict.

Despite Mr Sarkozy's insistence that France is fighting a battle against terror in Afghanistan, many people here feel they have just been sucked into Uncle Sam's war.

Earlier this week, the mother of another of the French paratroopers killed in the 18 August attack told the news magazine Le Nouvel Observateur that she had written a letter to Mr Sarkozy, begging him to get France out of the war.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy lays a medal on the coffin of a soldier killed in Afghanistan
President Sarkozy led mourners at the soldiers' funeral

"Stop following the example of President Bush," she wrote. "Let's stay French. Let's get our soldiers out of the quagmire."

Last month's ambush was France's worst single military loss in 25 years. As well as those killed, another 21 soldiers were injured.

Until then there had been little news coverage of the French mission, although some 3,000 of the country's troops are currently serving in Afghanistan.

But being confronted with full-page, glossy photographs of the insurgents who killed their troops is bound to rekindle arguments about what France's role in Afghanistan really is.

The French parliament has called for an urgent debate on the matter but on Thursday Mr Sarkozy - while acknowledging the difficulties and dangers endured by French troops - insisted they would not abandon their mission.

"If we abandon Afghanistan, we'll destabilise Pakistan," he warned.

"And I'd like to remind you that Pakistan has nuclear capabilities."


SEE ALSO
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