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Last Updated: Wednesday, 6 July, 2005, 15:30 GMT 16:30 UK
Olympic losers react to London's win

BBC reporters describe the reaction as cities that had hoped to host the 2012 Olympics learnt they had lost to London.

Paris: Caroline Wyatt

The crowds outside the Hotel de Ville, the Paris town hall, gasped and then booed with people looking at each other in disbelief as the result was announced.

President Jacques Chirac had wanted to arrive for the G8 summit a winner - instead he comes as a three-time loser

They were stunned and bitterly disappointed. Paris had been the favourite throughout, but over the past few weeks people had feared that London might trump the Paris bid with a final sprint to the finish line - and so it was.

Paris had so desperately wanted the games. This was its third try after being beaten by Barcelona in 1992 and Beijing for 2008.

This nation wanted a project that would unite it in these times of high unemployment, with France feeling it no longer quite knows how to deal with globalisation or its diminished place on the world stage.

This decision will exacerbate that general sense of malaise, especially as the winner is Paris' greatest rival, London. President Jacques Chirac had wanted to arrive for the G8 summit a winner.

Instead he comes as a three-time loser whose nation was pipped at the post by a victorious Britain.

Madrid: Marian Hens

Over the final weeks of the five-city race, Spanish officials had launched a huge campaign in the belief that Madrid had a strong chance of winning the vote.

Spaniards are greatly disappointed - Madrid's bid was backed by all Spanish parties and regions and by more than 80 million people

"A year ago they said we wouldn't make the cut and now we are in the top three," Madrid bid chief Feliciano Mayoral had said.

But London's victory has not put the organisers of Madrid's failed bid completely off. The Spanish authorities have pledged to try again for 2016. The mayor of the Spanish capital, Alberto Ruiz Gallardon, claimed that "there are neither losers nor winners".

Spaniards, however, are greatly disappointed. Madrid's bid was backed by all Spanish parties and regions and by millions of people.

With 83% of Madrid's Olympic venues in place or under construction, many Spaniards believed that their compact, low-cost project was very strong.

Other good points included environmental policy and public transport. The Spanish capital had offered to organise the "environmentally friendliest" and first "car-free" Olympics in history.

However, the bid raised concerns about the number of rooms available in hotels and other establishments and the noise level around the Olympic village, which would have been located near the M-40, one of Madrid's main highways.

New York: Matthew Wells

New Yorkers never really expected to get the Olympics, although it marks a rare defeat for their billionaire mayor, Michael Bloomberg.

The 2012 Olympics is just another stale bagel of an idea now, and by lunchtime the rejection will be forgotten
It was very early in the morning local time, but only a few hundred people were gathered to watch the elimination process in front of the network cameras at Rockefeller Plaza.

There was no real evidence of large public support here - something that was obvious from the unseemly row over building an Olympic stadium on Manhattan's Westside.

Half the city did not want it and the plan was defeated a few weeks ago.

Although the mayor and his Olympic bid official scrambled together a "plan B" in the borough of Queens, it spoke volumes about the strange sense of ambivalence felt here.

Raising New York's ability to cope in the wake of the 11 September attacks smacked a little bit of desperation by the city's delegation in Singapore, perhaps.

It also linked this great international city a little too much with an administration that is deeply unpopular around the world.

The final result was carried with great excitement, live on all the breakfast television networks. Some channels were taking a wicked delight in Paris' disappointment.

In the end, New Yorkers will shrug their shoulders, knowing that other great things will be coming their way soon. The 2012 Olympics is just another stale bagel of an idea now, and by lunchtime the rejection will be forgotten.

Moscow: Artyom Liss

For thousands of Muscovites who gathered just outside Red Square, tensions remained high right until the very end. Even as the world's media were busy reporting Moscow's loss, the show set up to support Russia's bid went on.

Nobody told the crowd their city had dropped out of the race, so no tears were shed. A member of Moscow's bid team admits that they wanted to save the disappointment for later.

After all, Russia's poor result was something most expected, but few spoke about.

The fact that Russia's President Vladimir Putin stayed away from Singapore made some people in Moscow wonder - did their country really want the games or was it just a PR stunt?

Just hours before the winner was announced, Russia was divided into two camps.

Some people took the lead from Moscow's bid committee and insisted their capital was going to win.

Others merely hoped Moscow would go through to the second round - and "make everything unpredictable", as the state-owned news agency RIA Novosti put it.

Only now, though, is the sad truth beginning to sink in.

But Moscow is not giving up. There is already talk of bidding for the 2016 games - and, as the speaker of Russian parliament Boris Gryzlov put it, "lessons will be learnt".

Among these, almost certainly, will be a lesson on how to prepare the bid in greater detail - and how to put all the country's weight behind it.

After all, it was mostly the vagueness of Moscow's bid which disappointed IOC evaluators.

And the fact that Russia's President Vladimir Putin stayed away from Singapore, only sending in a video address in halting English, certainly made some people in Moscow wonder - did their country really want the games or was it just a PR stunt?




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