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Last Updated: Thursday, 22 July, 2004, 22:44 GMT 23:44 UK
'Carnage' at Turkish crash site
Scene of disaster
Locals clambered around the carriages looking for survivors
Witnesses to Thursday's rail disaster in north-western Turkey have been describing scenes of carnage and chaos around the derailed Ankara-bound train.

Thirty-six of the train's 230 passengers died with another 68 reported injured.

Surviving passengers told of how carriages left the track with extraordinary violence and people were literally thrown from the train.

Ocrun Acabey, who was in one of the least affected carriages, told NTV television that the ride had been far rougher than usual.

"Before the crash, the train shook strongly two or three times at bends. First we swung to the left, then the carriage turned over to the right," he said.

Child victims

Inhabitants of the surrounding area came to help in the rescue effort, and were seen clambering in the darkness over upturned carriages looking for survivors.

The scene is one of carnage - there are people lying all over the place
Oguz Dizer
journalist
Some tried to open jammed carriage doors while others bashed on windows.

The mayor of the nearby town of Pamukova, Feridun Turan, said he had seen "total chaos".

"There were heads separated from bodies, there were legs," he said.

"The scene is one of carnage... There are people lying all over the place," Oguz Dizer, a journalist at the scene, told NTV.

Many of the victims were minors, the CNN Turk TV said, showing rescue workers carrying crying and blood-covered children into a hospital.




SEE ALSO:
Train hits school bus in Turkey
16 Apr 04 |  Europe



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