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Sunday, April 18, 1999 Published at 09:17 GMT 10:17 UK


World: Europe

Clinton: 'Tyrant' Milosevic must go

Bill Clinton: Yugoslavia must be rid of "belligerent tyrant"

US President Bill Clinton has said there will be no peace in the Balkans until Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic has gone from office.

Kosovo: Special Report
He will ask Congress early in the week for at least $6bn extra to fund the allied operation against Yugoslavia.

Mr Clinton, in an article for London's Sunday Times newspaper, said Serbia needed a democratic transition, "for the region cannot be secure with a belligerent tyrant in its midst" - a view supported by Nato Secretary General Javier Solana in a BBC interview.

'Campaign will continue'


Humphrey Hawksley reports: Clinton is "committed to freedom and human rights"
Mr Clinton said Milosevic could end the crisis immediately by withdrawing his forces from Kosovo, letting in an international security force and allowing Kosovo Albanian refugees to return home and enjoy self-rule.

"But if he will not do that, our campaign will continue, shifting the balance of power against him until we succeed," he said.

"Ultimately, Mr Milosevic must either cut his mounting losses or lose his ability to maintain his grip on Kosovo."


[ image: Javier Solana: Democracy means stability]
Javier Solana: Democracy means stability
Mr Solana said on BBC One's Breakfast with Frost programme that democracy was a top priority in Yugoslavia for peace to return to the Balkans.

He said: "I think it would be very difficult to have peace in the region, and in particular Yugoslavia, if it is not a democratic Yugoslavia.


Javier Solana: "It will be very difficult to have peace in the region"
"It is very difficult to talk about autonomy (for Kosovo) which is a democratic concept in a country which is not democratic.

"Therefore the democratisation of Yugoslavia is a basic element for the stability and the prosperity for the country and the people."





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