[an error occurred while processing this directive]
BBC News
watch One-Minute World News
LANGUAGES
Russian
Polish
Albanian
Greek
Serbian
Turkish
More
Last Updated:  Wednesday, 19 March, 2003, 10:24 GMT
Conservationists play part in lemurs' future
Gerald Durrell
The Trust has been protecting animals for over 40 years
The work of Jersey's Durrell Wildlife Trust has helped to ensure the natural habitat of lemurs in Madagascar is protected.

Staff from the Trust have been helping to educate people in the area about the threats to lemurs by setting up workshops and village festivals.

It is hoped this will increase the numbers of the highly endangered species.

Lake Alaotra is the largest in Madagascar and is the only natural habitat of the Alaotran gentle lemur.

Brighter future

The area was declared a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance in 1998.

But in the past 10 years the number of lemurs has fallen from 7,500 to 3,000, mainly due to marshland being made into rice fields and widespread burning of the land.

Villagers also hunted the lemurs for food.

During the past 12 months their numbers have increased by around 300 and Jersey Trust staff are hopeful of a brighter future for the animal.


SEE ALSO:
Smallest primates discovered in Madagascar
14 Nov 00 |  Science/Nature


INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia
UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature | Technology | Health
Have Your Say | In Pictures | Week at a Glance | Country Profiles | In Depth | Programmes
Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific