BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Russian Polish Albanian Greek Czech Ukrainian Serbian Turkish Romanian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Europe  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Thursday, 2 January, 2003, 15:54 GMT
Denmark to hold second euro vote
Danish Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen celebrates his victory in November 2002
Rasmussen's right-wing coalition was elected last year
Danish Prime Minister Anders Fogh Rasmussen has said his country will hold a new referendum on euro membership, despite the fact that the proposal was rejected in 2000.

I find it fairest to the population that we know the content of the new treaty before we take a position on the Danish exemptions

Anders Fogh Rasmussen, Danish PM
In his New Year speech, Mr Rasmussen said that by opting out of the euro, Danes had no influence in vital areas of co-operation within the European Union.

But he said a vote should only be held after 2004, when the content of the EU's revised basic treaty is known, and several months after a similar poll is held in Sweden.

Correspondents say votes in Denmark and Sweden could leave Britain as the only EU member not to use the single currency.

'Fair offer'

Speaking on the first anniversary of the launch of the euro, Mr Rasmussen said his country's "interests are damaged... because of the opt-outs", adopted by Denmark.

"We should therefore get rid of the opt-out. But naturally, this can only happen after a referendum."

Mr Rasmussen was referring to four key exemptions from EU co-operation approved by Danish voters in 1993, including the decision to keep the Danish kroner.

"I find it fairest to the population that we know the content of the new treaty before we take a position on the Danish exemptions," Mr Rasmussen said.

Swedish influence

The euro issue has stirred heated debates in this Scandinavian nation of just over five million people.

Swedish children stand in front of a shop
Public doubts: Sweden is doing well with the krona

Many still fear the adoption of the euro will be a threat to the country's sovereignty as important decisions will be made by EU officials in Brussels.

However, recent opinion polls show that nearly two-thirds of Danes have spoken in favour of joining the euro.

A majority in the Danish Parliament also presses for euro membership, urging voters to get rid of the opt-out clauses.

Correspondent say that a similar vote in neighbouring Sweden on 14 September will have a great influence on Danes.

Denmark - a member of the EU since 1974 - voted against joining the euro-zone in September 2000.

See also:

18 Dec 02 | Europe
30 Nov 02 | Europe
02 Jan 03 | Politics
29 Nov 02 | Europe
10 Aug 01 | Business
14 Nov 02 | Politics
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Europe stories are at the foot of the page.


 E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Europe stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes