BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Russian Polish Albanian Greek Czech Ukrainian Serbian Turkish Romanian
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Europe  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Thursday, 7 November, 2002, 12:01 GMT
Romanians to sell sperm to save jobs
Sperm
A single sperm donation fee equals a month's wages
Romanian workers desperate to save their jobs have hit upon an unusual fundraiser: sperm.


They always told us to come up with a solution - now we have found one that even the best economists have never thought of

Union leader Ion Cotescu
About 100 workers at a car factory in Campulung, central Romania, are planning to sell sperm to a fertility clinic to try to reduce their company's debt.

The idea came to them after local media reports that a clinic in the western city of Timisoara was offering donors the equivalent of $50 per donation - almost two-thirds of the workers' $80 monthly wage.

"We're afraid of losing our jobs," the plant's union leader Ion Cotescu told the AFP news agency.

"Orders are down and we have not been paid our salaries for several months."

Saddled with debts

The ARO Campulung car plant, which produces four-wheel drives, has more than 5,000 employees - and owes millions of dollars in debts.

Statue of Lenin in Bucharest is dismantled in 1990
Communism left Romania a difficult legacy
The Romanian economy was run into the ground by the communist Ceausescu regime in its attempt to pay off national debt.

This left behind poverty and political instability - an environment in which reforms are difficult to foster, correspondents say.

Car factory officials would only comment that the scheme was "shameful".

But Mr Cotescu said: "Our feasibility study shows that if 1,000 workers donate their sperm for several months, we can get enough funds to pay part of the plant's debts."

He told the Reuters news agency that the scheme was also a protest against the government's privatisation authority APAPS, which had failed to find investment in the plant.

"They always told us to come up with a solution. Now we have found one that even the best economists have never thought of.

"I hope APAPS will like it," Mr Cotescu said.

See also:

12 Aug 02 | Business
08 Mar 02 | Country profiles
11 Aug 01 | From Our Own Correspondent
08 Oct 02 | Business
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Europe stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Europe stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes