Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education



Front Page

World

UK

UK Politics

Business

Sci/Tech

Health

Education

Sport

Entertainment

Talking Point
On Air
Feedback
Low Graphics
Help

Tuesday, October 13, 1998 Published at 22:17 GMT 23:17 UK


World: Europe

Hostages alive, says Chechen president

President Maskhadov greeted by Solidarity MP Maciej Jankowski


The BBC's Damian Grammaticus: "Kidnapping has become commonplace in Chechnya"
The president of Chechnya says four telephone engineers kidnapped in Chechnya 10 days ago are alive, but that he does not know where they are being held.

The three Britons and one New Zealander were abducted from the Chechen capital, Grozny, following a shoot-out between their bodyguards and a gang of kidnappers.


[ image: Kidnapped engineers:  Stanley Shaw (top left), Rudolf Petschi (top right), Darren Hickey (bottom right),  and Peter Kennedy]
Kidnapped engineers: Stanley Shaw (top left), Rudolf Petschi (top right), Darren Hickey (bottom right), and Peter Kennedy
President Aslan Maskhadov, speaking in the Polish capital, Warsaw, said the men were safe and well.

He said Chechen security forces were doing all they could to discover where they were being held and by whom, but had so far been unsuccessful.

A BBC correspondent in Warsaw, James Coomarasamy, says the Chechen leader denied claims that the engineers had been working in Chechnya officially for a government-run telecommunications company.

He said the first he had known of their presence was when they were captured.

Their abduction came just a fortnight after the release of two British aid workers who were held hostage in Chechnya for 15 months.

A spokesman for Chechnya's security ministry reported last week that the hostages were safe, but said no demands or conditions for their release had been set.

The hostages - Britons Peter Kennedy, Darren Hickey, and Rudolf Petschi, and New Zealand's Stanley Shaw - were kidnapped on 3 October while working for Granger Telecom, a British telephone company, installing 300,000 telephone lines across Chechnya.

The work of laying the lines for Chechen Telecom, believed to be worth tens of millions of dollars, has been suspended since the four men were kidnapped.



Advanced options | Search tips




Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage | ©




Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East | South Asia



Relevant Stories

08 Oct 98 | Europe
Chechnya hostages 'alive and well'

06 Oct 98 | Europe
Hostage families meet officials

05 Oct 98 | Europe
Kidnapped workers 'ignored advice'

04 Oct 98 | Europe
Profile of Chechnya





Internet Links


The British Foreign Office

The Chechen Republic

Granger Telecom


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.




In this section

Violence greets Clinton visit

Russian forces pound Grozny

EU fraud: a billion dollar bill

Next steps for peace

Cardinal may face loan-shark charges

From Business
Vodafone takeover battle heats up

Trans-Turkish pipeline deal signed

French party seeks new leader

Jube tube debut

Athens riots for Clinton visit

UN envoy discusses Chechnya in Moscow

Solana new Western European Union chief

Moldova's PM-designate withdraws

Chechen government welcomes summit

In pictures: Clinton's violent welcome

Georgia protests over Russian 'attack'

UN chief: No Chechen 'catastrophe'

New arms control treaty for Europe

From Business
Mannesmann fights back

EU fraud -- a billion-dollar bill

New moves in Spain's terror scandal

EU allows labelling of British beef

UN seeks more security in Chechnya

Athens riots for Clinton visit

Russia's media war over Chechnya

Homeless suffer as quake toll rises

Analysis: East-West relations must shift