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Tuesday, 13 November, 2001, 18:23 GMT
In pictures: Hidden treasures of Hasankeyf
Doubts are hanging over Turkey's plans to build a controversial dam in Ilisu, after the main UK construction firm pulled out of the project. Opponents want the dam abandoned - partly to save the treasures of the ancient city of Hasankeyf, which will be lost forever under the waters if the dam goes ahead.

Picture: Save Hasankeyf Organisation
Hasankeyf is situated beside the River Tigris

Picture: Save Hasankeyf Organisation
Its magnificent rock caves have labyrinths of stairs and passageways

Picture: Save Hasankeyf Organisation
Ancient remains can be seen around the city

Picture: Save Hasankeyf Organisation
The city was an important economic and cultural centre, because of its strategic location

A sheer cliff towers up over the southern bank with a castle at the top
A 12th century stone bridge crossing the Tigris is among the sights

Picture: Angela Barber
Kurds say that Hasankeyf is the last remnant of Kurdish identity

Picture: Angela Barber
Thousands of people would have to leave if the dam went ahead

See also:

13 Nov 01 | Business
Balfour abandons Turkish dam project
01 Aug 00 | From Our Own Correspondent
Time running out for cultural treasure
12 Jul 00 | UK Politics
MPs' anger over Turkish dam
10 Jul 00 | Europe
Refuge for Turkey's dam victims
22 Jan 00 | Europe
Turkish dam controversy
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