BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Europe
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Friday, 29 June, 2001, 12:18 GMT 13:18 UK
Ex-Yugoslav partners praise extradition
Croatian papers
Papers in the old Yugoslavia have trumpeted the story
By Bethany Bell in Vienna

The extradition of Slobodan Milosevic has been warmly welcomed by senior ministers from the former Yugoslav republics of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Hercegovina and Macedonia.

Speaking at a news conference in the Austrian capital, Vienna, the ministers said the step was a very positive signal for the stability of the region.

There was a palpable sense of relief among ministers, who had gathered in Vienna to sign an agreement on the division of assets from the old Yugoslav federation.


This is a symbolic message - bad times are over and good times can begin

Slovenian Foreign Minister Dimitrij Rupel
The big shark had now been taken out of the water, declared the Bosnian Foreign Minister, Zlatko Lagumdzija.

It was a big relief for his countrymen, he said, even for those who had supported Milosevic in the past.

Slovenia's Foreign Minister, Dimitrij Rupel, said the extradition of Milosevic would have a positive impact on the stability of the entire region.

The bad times are over, he said - the good times have begun.

Former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic
Milosevic's extradition was greeted with relief by ministers
The Macedonian Vice-President, Ilija Filipovski, said the news came at the right time for his troubled country - a message, he said, to terrorists that justice would be followed through.

His Croatian counterpart, Tonino Picula, said the extradition of Milosevic was good news for the victims of the family and a chance for the people of Yugoslavia to put the past behind them.

For his part, the Yugoslav Foreign Minister, Goran Svilanovic, said he was optimistic about the step, but he said it was time to stop linking the personal destiny of one man to the future of his country.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Europe stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Europe stories